You Don't Even Know, Dude

Apr 20
heliotrooper:

AND HERE WE HAVE MY BIGGEST FUCKING PET PEEVE

heliotrooper:

AND HERE WE HAVE MY BIGGEST FUCKING PET PEEVE

Apr 20

crowbara:

ipgd:

this is really good

ah yes perfect rendition of the american government imo. nailed it

Apr 20
Apr 20
Best trivia team name of the night #ripggm

Best trivia team name of the night #ripggm

Apr 20
Apr 20
Apr 20

constellation-funk replied to your photo “If I’m being honest, this movie was kind of a snooze. I’ve…”

Man vs The Self, no antagonist required

That can be done and done well, but at no point did Jiro suffer or have to make a life-impacting decision. He basically got everything he wanted at all points throughout the movie (except his wife being sick).

Have you seen it? I’m down to talk to someone about its merits if you have.

Apr 19
bustermoody:

I colored that TMNT/Ghostbusters mash-up drawing I did.

bustermoody:

I colored that TMNT/Ghostbusters mash-up drawing I did.

Apr 19

My neighbors are having a party close enough to my bedroom window that I can hear everything they’re saying.

One guy is talking about Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace and he’s getting a lot of things wrong.

I can feel my skin crawl.

Apr 19
If I’m being honest, this movie was kind of a snooze.
I’ve unabashedly loved basically 100% of Hayao Miyazaki’s output from his entire career (all that I’ve seen, anyway; there are a few holes) but this was a bloated two-hour talkfest with no stakes and nearly zero tension.
The visuals were dazzling. Of course. Of course they were. They always are. Miyazaki couldn’t draw a boring picture if they put a gun to his head. All the classic visual tropes (bubbling tears, delicious food, hair movement used to depict surprise or tension) were intact and made parts of this film comforting, like a reminder that our old friend is doing okay. But yeesh, man, you gotta give us some pathos with the story.
If I went into it knowing it was non-fiction, I might have enjoyed it more. It’s the story of a Japanese aeronautical engineer who was obsessed with planes his entire life, and designed planes for Japan in World War II. Every scene is essentially him going to a new place to work on planes, immediately being correctly assessed as the most talented and hard-working person there, and then working until he outgrows the location and goes somewhere else. We also spend some time with him and his fiancee as she succumbs to tuberculosis, but it’s clear his true love is planes, and their romance never feels organic. (Also, I just looked it up, every detail about his private life was fictional. What’s the point?)
Miyazaki really shines in the elaborate dream sequences where our hero fantasizes about his planes and the things they’ll be able to do, often assessing if they’ll work in his own subconscious. These parts are captivating and display his mastery, but are few and far between. The lack of a real antagonist or, honestly, dramatic stakes of any kind keep this from being the classic it deserves to be.
If this wasn’t the final film from one of my favorite film makers, I might not be so hard on it, but the fact that the greatest living animator is retiring from the craft without the smash-bang-boom of the beautiful fantasies from his past is more than a little disappointing.

If I’m being honest, this movie was kind of a snooze.

I’ve unabashedly loved basically 100% of Hayao Miyazaki’s output from his entire career (all that I’ve seen, anyway; there are a few holes) but this was a bloated two-hour talkfest with no stakes and nearly zero tension.

The visuals were dazzling. Of course. Of course they were. They always are. Miyazaki couldn’t draw a boring picture if they put a gun to his head. All the classic visual tropes (bubbling tears, delicious food, hair movement used to depict surprise or tension) were intact and made parts of this film comforting, like a reminder that our old friend is doing okay. But yeesh, man, you gotta give us some pathos with the story.

If I went into it knowing it was non-fiction, I might have enjoyed it more. It’s the story of a Japanese aeronautical engineer who was obsessed with planes his entire life, and designed planes for Japan in World War II. Every scene is essentially him going to a new place to work on planes, immediately being correctly assessed as the most talented and hard-working person there, and then working until he outgrows the location and goes somewhere else. We also spend some time with him and his fiancee as she succumbs to tuberculosis, but it’s clear his true love is planes, and their romance never feels organic. (Also, I just looked it up, every detail about his private life was fictional. What’s the point?)

Miyazaki really shines in the elaborate dream sequences where our hero fantasizes about his planes and the things they’ll be able to do, often assessing if they’ll work in his own subconscious. These parts are captivating and display his mastery, but are few and far between. The lack of a real antagonist or, honestly, dramatic stakes of any kind keep this from being the classic it deserves to be.

If this wasn’t the final film from one of my favorite film makers, I might not be so hard on it, but the fact that the greatest living animator is retiring from the craft without the smash-bang-boom of the beautiful fantasies from his past is more than a little disappointing.